Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Type: ship
Built: 1952

The following report was sent into our website by M. Wryter on September 26, 2014:

“In 1986 I was a ship keeper in Toronto living aboard the motor vessel D. C. Everest. She was built in 1952 in Kingston, Ontario and at the time of her launch then she was the most expensive of her type and class built at the Kingston shipyards. She flew her flag initially with Marathon Paper Mills, then was sold to American Can and flew their house flag.

Somewhere along her career, she ended up on the scrap list and ended her days in the turning basin in Toronto tied outboard an old Imperial Oil tanker the London. There they sat for a couple of years until I became her keeper and moved aboard.

There was nothing untoward about the Everest, no startling history for her as she was a workhorse and not subject to glamour or anything spectacular in her duties. So this outlines the vessel and some of her history.

It was a hot August Sat. eve in the city and I had invited a few friends over for some good music and some social drinks, a little friendly get together for some relaxing fun. By 7:30 or so everyone was aboard, deck chairs were laid out on the hatches. Speakers were hooked up and a cooler with 3 bottles of wine was placed on the hatch along with glasses, the tunes cranked up (it was a dock so no one as around). We sat and had a few, told stories and chatted about all sorts of things, just relaxing and having fun, the eve flowing well.

At about 10:45 or so some had to leave so the gathering broke up and we all headed to the gangway to say goodnight and go our separate ways. And it was at the gangway that lead to the inboard vessel, the London that we were gathered when someone said, “Look”, and pointed to the stairs on the starboard side of the ship. We all looked pretty well in unison and we all collectively saw a set of legs walking up the starboard stairs case to the Captain’s cabin. All 9 people saw this and everyone was in a state of shock over it.

Some shook their heads, others just in awe, one turned away and was sick. It was one of those unexpected things that happened and everyone reacted to it differently.

We all gathered our wits about it, some laughed it off as too much wine, but the fact was that we had all seen it collectively. The next day I had a couple of calls and it was discussed and after a few days we all agreed it had been seen by us all. Only one woman said that she would never set foot on the ship ever again, and well that was her final response to that eve.

She was eventually towed to India and broken up for scrap, so whatever ghostly crewman that was perhaps he found himself a new home.”

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